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Home » Kidney Stone Stuck in Urethra Female: Symptoms and Diagnosis

Kidney Stone Stuck in Urethra Female: Symptoms and Diagnosis

Kidney Stone Stuck in Urethra Female, Key Facts:

  • Urethral stones are relatively rare in females.
  • Certain conditions can increase the risk of urethral stones in females, such as urethral diverticulum.
  • Symptoms of a kidney stone stuck in the female urethra include urethral pain, urinary obstruction, severe urethral pain, persistent urge to urinate, bleeding, and other symptoms.
  • Diagnosis of a stone stuck in the urethra can be done through physical examination, ultrasound, CT scan, MRI, urine analysis, and cystoscopy.
  • Treatment of stuck stones in the urethra involves inserting a catheter or a cystoscope to push the stone back into the bladder (to be removed later via surgery).

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What are the odds of a kidney stone being stuck in a female urethra?

Urethral stones are relatively rare in females. The urethra in females is shorter and wider than in males, making it easier for small stones to pass out of the body without causing any symptoms.

Additionally, the female urethra has fewer curves and bends, which means that stones are less likely to get stuck in the urethra.

However, certain conditions, such as urinary tract infections, dehydration, and anatomical abnormalities, can increase the risk of urethral stones in females.

Overall, while urethral stones are uncommon in females, it is important to be aware of the symptoms and seek medical attention if you suspect you may have a stone stuck in your urethra.

Symptoms of a kidney stone stuck in female urethra.

1. Urethral Pain

Females with urethral stones may experience a pinching or sharp pain in the urethra, which can be quite uncomfortable. This pain may be accompanied by a burning sensation during urination.

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The pain can also be in the form of discomfort or foreign body sensation (itchy feeling) in the urethra during the presence of the stone inside the urethra.

It is important to seek medical attention if you are experiencing these symptoms, as they could indicate a stone stuck in the urethra.

2. Urinary Obstruction

Although rare, the presence of a kidney stone stuck in the female urethra typically leads to partial or complete obstruction of the urine stream.

In a female with a stuck stone in the urethra, urination can be either:

Complete urethral obstruction by a stone is rare in females, and if it happens, it is considered an urgent condition that requires immediate relief.

The treatment of stuck stones in the urethra is by inserting a catheter or a cystoscope to push the stone back into the bladder (to be removed later via surgery).

3. Severe urethral pain:

Persistent pain at the urethra is also very common. The pain is often severe and is associated with uncomfortable foreign body sensations.

4. A persistent Urge to urinate

The stuck stone inside the urethra creates a feel of the persistent severe urge to pee (despite an empty bladder). The urge is independent of urinary obstruction and may be present with an empty bladder.

5. Bleeding (bloody urine).

The urine that comes out from patients with urethral stones may be pink or reddish in color, as the stone typically causes injury to the urethral lining and bleeding.

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Moreover, blood may come out from the urethral opening without urination (in severe cases).

6. Other Symptoms of urethral stones in women

  • A sense of mass in the urethra
  • Pain at the end of urination (stone stuck at the junction between the bladder and urethra).
  • Lower abdominal pain.
  • Nausea.
  • Vomiting
  • Cloudy urine.

Diagnosis

To diagnose a stone that is stuck in your urethral, your doctor may require one or more of:

  • Physical Examination: the doctor will perform an abdominal and pelvic examination to assess any tenderness or masses in the bladder, urethra, or surrounding areas. The female urethral is wide and short; physical examination may reveal the stone or the diverticulum.
  • Ultrasound: This imaging test uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the kidneys, bladder, and urethra. It can help identify the size and location of urethral stones.
  • CT Scan: a computed tomography (CT) scan can provide detailed images of the urinary tract, including any stones that may be present.
  • MRI: a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan can provide detailed images of the urinary tract, including any stones that may be present.
  • Urine Analysis: the presence of blood in the urine, along with white blood cells and bacteria, may indicate the presence of urinary tract infections or kidney stones.
  • Cystoscopy: This procedure involves the insertion of a thin, flexible tube with a camera on the end into the urethra. It allows the doctor to view the urethra and bladder and identify any stones that may be present.

Based on the results of these diagnostic tests, the doctor can determine the best course of treatment for urethral stones.